Sergio Marchionne’s march through Ferrari continues to leave a wake of collateral damage. The turnover at the Scuderia has been extensive over this past season and rumors of a potential float as well as the Fiat empire’s need for Ferrari to be a sexy portfolio item in which to lure investors continues to cause changes.

Today it was announced that short-time team boss Marco Mattiacci will now be replaced by Maurizio Arrivabene. Here is the official press statement:

Ferrari is pleased to announce the appointment of Maurizio Arrivabene as Managing Director of Gestione Sportiva and as Team Principal of Scuderia Ferrari, replacing Marco Mattiacci.

Mr Arrivabene comes to Ferrari from Philip Morris, which he joined in 1997 after a 20 years career in marketing and promotions in Italy and abroad.Maurizio Arrivabene has held a variety of posts in Philip Morris, leading up to his appointment in 2007 as Vice President of Marlboro Global Communication & Promotions for Philip Morris International and, in 2011, as Vice President Consumer Channel Strategy and Event Marketing. He has been an independent member of the board of Juventus FC since 2012 also. From 2011 to 2012 he has been a member of the Sport Business Academy (SDA Bocconi School of Management and RCS Sport), in the Advisory Team Program.

Throughout his time with Philip Morris, Maurizio Arrivabene has been closely involved in the partnership with Ferrari both in Maranello and on the world’s racing circuits. He has also represented all Formula One sponsors on the F1 Commission since 2010.

“We decided to appoint Maurizio Arrivabene because, at this historic moment in time for the Scuderia and for Formula 1, we need a person with a thorough understanding not just of Ferrari but also of the governance mechanisms and requirements of the sport,” commented Ferrari Chairman Sergio Marchionne. “Maurizio has a unique wealth of knowledge: he has been extremely close to the Scuderia for years and, as a member of the F1 Commission, is also keenly aware of the challenges we are facing. He has been a constant source of innovative ideas focused on revitalisation of Formula One. His managerial experience on a highly complex and closely regulated market is also of great importance, and will help him manage and motivate the team. I am delighted to have been able to secure his leadership for our racing activities”.

“We would also like to thank Marco Mattiacci for his service to Ferrari in the last 15 years and we wish him well in his future endeavours” concluded Mr. Marchionne.

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Tom Firth
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Tom Firth

Well it’s very political to me, first and foremost, Ferrari need someone that can play the political game, both with the series power-brokers and with other teams in the best interests of Ferrari. Something have lost somewhat with LDM not being at the helm, the other interesting thought, perhaps. Ferrari hired a director from Philip Morris, who is primarily in marketing/sponsorship organisation, one season before the current contract with Philip Morris supposedly ends, coincidence?

MIE
Editor
MIE

Ferrari failed to win either championship (again), and they lost their greatest asset (Alonso).

It isn’t really surprising that heads are starting to roll. It’s almost like Enzo was in charge…

Jason Paul
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Jason Paul

So they chose someone that knows nothing about cars or racing them to lead the most prestigious racing team in the world. Good plan.

photogcw
Member
photogcw

It worked for Flavio Briatore at the Benetton team.

adaptable1
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adaptable1

Funny how this comes after Fernando’s comments about his negotiation discussions with Marco after Monza. Isn’t Ferrari being spun off from Fiat? Timed like a golden parachute…

wrecked2002
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wrecked2002

So if I am understanding this right, apparently the Scuderia is the last stop on the way out the door for Ferrari management. “Marco will bring his unique talents to the team…” & then they pull a Keyser Sose & he’s gone. This is when all that italian passion they build into their cars, needs to be tempered by methodical thinking, (german). People shouldn’t try to learn formula 1 while leading the oldest and most prestigious team on the grid. I know this and I’m just a schlep! Long term plans, gentlemen, show the Tifosi that you have a plan,… Read more »

dude
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dude

“We would also like to thank Marco Mattiacci for his service to Ferrari in the last 15 years and we wish him well in his future endeavours.”

Does this mean he goes back to his old position in North America or get fired from Ferrari completely?

jeff
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jeff

I had guessed Mattiacci was being groomed for future Presidency by Marchionne; guess not. Were the assertions of Mattiacci’s appointment being a reactionary stopgap to Domenicali’s resignation true?

The politicking Tom Firth points out rings true to me; whether it’s collateral “damage” or necessary reorganization remains to be seen.

jeff
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jeff

J. Saward relays in his comments section that Marchionne appointed Mattiacci, and further asserts Arrivabene was forced upon Ferrari by Phillip Morris.

If true, this further adds credence to Tom’s marketing/bargaining POV; what’s Marlboro’s competitive angle though?

The plot thinnens; too bad for Ferrari, as Mattiacci, despite wobbly knees at the start, seemed to me the perfect Manager to reorganize a shambling Scuderia, and a savvy player with the pulse of the American market..

PM
Guest
PM

Maybe Mattiacci finally realized what he had gotten himself into and decided to jump ship. It seems odd that the only mention of him was “We wish him all the best in his future endeavours.” From what I had heard, he was a great salesman and even if he wasn’t fit to run a racing team, it doesn’t make a lot of sense to get rid of him completely. This could also be Marchionne asserting his authority and getting rid of everyone who was too close to Luca. The good news is that with all of the shenanigans, we won’t… Read more »

The Captain
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The Captain

Welcome to the circus that is Maranello Sebastian. Remember that guy you just signed a contract to work for.. yea he’s out already.

NeilM
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NeilM

“Arrivabene” may be a fine name (“arrive well” in Italian), but the important thing for Ferrari now is to finish well. I wonder what Marchionne thinks is going to be accomplished at Maranello between now and the start of the 2015 season next March? One word of advice for Maurizio Arrivabene: don’t sign any long leases. In fact a nice hotel suite on a week-to-week basis might be prudent.

solutionc
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solutionc

Now its official maybe someone didn’t think that signing the second best driver at Red Bull was a good idea.

Junipero Mariano
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Junipero Mariano

Was he fired or did he resign? Mattiaci delivered sales until he was placed in the Scuderia. If he really wanted the job, it doesn’t seem like he had a realistic chance at winning races until at least next season.

I did just think of something, though; maybe he wasn’t able to get the engine freeze rule changed soon enough for Marchionne’s liking?

Rapierman
Member
Rapierman

This has all the makings of another “Steinbrenner” situation, and that never ends pretty. :P

Jack Flash (Aust)
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Jack Flash (Aust)

“Now its official maybe someone didn’t think that signing the second best driver at Red Bull was a good idea.”

► Pffft… That is GOLD. Bwa ha ha ha LoL

peterriva
Member
peterriva

As an idiom, Arrivabene means “just in time” as in he came for dinner just in time.
Portent?

jonnowoody
Guest
jonnowoody

Oh dear. Committee appointed by committee.

Rick Lay
Guest
Rick Lay

15 year of service and fire your top sales person. I wonder if that as a smart move?