Ladies and gentlemen, I give you: The FIA’s Lewis Law

Buried down beneath the World Motor Sports Council’s decision about the 2011 calendar and the fate of the last grid spot — being handled so deftly and sarcastically by Grace — is a ruling that I think only can be called “The Lewis Law.”

Here it is, in full:

DRIVING CONDUCT

The FIA, both in its motor sport and mobility roles, has a strong interest in promoting road safety. Competitors at FIA events must act as ambassadors for the sport, be aware their conduct on the road must be exemplary and respect road safety rules. A proposal to amend the international sporting code will be submitted to the FIA General Assembly to clarify that any holder of an International Super Licence must also be in possession of a current road driving licence. Additionally, the Code will be amended to clarify that if an International Super Licence holder is involved in a serious road traffic offence recognised by a national police authority, the FIA, depending on the severity of the case, may issue a warning or refer the matter to the International Disciplinary Tribunal, which may temporarily or indefinitely withdraw the competitor’s International Super Licence.

It isn’t too hard to read between those lines, huh? For those having trouble, I’ll re-word it below:

DRIVING CONDUCT

The FIA, both in its motor sport and mobility roles, has a strong interest in promoting road safety, Lewis Hamilton. Competitors at FIA events must act as ambassadors for the sport, do you hear us, Lewis, be aware their conduct on the road must be exemplary and respect road safety rules. That means you, Lewis! A proposal to amend the international sporting code will be submitted to the FIA General Assembly to clarify that any holder of an International Super Licence, such as you Lewis, must also be in possession of a current road driving licence. Additionally, the Code will be amended to clarify that if an International Super Licence holder is involved in a serious road traffic offence — are you listening, Lewis, this is the important part — recognised by a national police authority, the FIA, depending on the severity of the case, may issue a warning or refer the matter to the International Disciplinary Tribunal, which may temporarily or indefinitely withdraw the competitor’s International Super Licence. Seriously, Lewis. We mean it.

The sad part of this is that I think it rules out the possibility of Grace, Mark H or Paul ever getting a Super License now. They are like the see no evil, hear no evil and speak no evil of hooning.

I would love to know who proposed this rule. There is zero chance — in my opinion — this has to do with anything other than Lewis’ Australian driving incident (if that wasn’t clear!), and while it makes sense given the FIA’s mission concerning road safety, it is a rule that in the recent past really only applies to one guy.

But I suppose it is one of those cases of a law or rule only being thought up after the fact.

Does it go too far, though? Should on-track and on-road driving be linked? And then there is the whole issue of whether Lewis’ little “hoongate” deserved all the attention it got and whether it would have risen to a level for the FIA to intervene. And given how much credibility we all think the FIA has, I can only imagine the hand-wringing that would follow such a decision. How would you feel if your favorite driver — or the driver leading the charge to wins or even a championship for your favorite team — were suddenly pulled from F1 because he was going to fast during rush hour on the Beltway around Washington DC?

(Because you know Jenson would be in a hurry to not be late for dinner with a certain Washingtonian.)

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