Ed. Note~ We’ve certainly had our share of negativity regarding the proposed 2014 engine regulations changes so it was an intriguing notion to have our resident F1B reader and wonderful Australian f1 sycophant, Adam Vella, weigh in on the “pro” side of the argument. Sure, he’s an F1 fan and that means noise but Adam decided that he could reconcile the changes with faith in F1 technical wizards and the promise of more power for his road car. Here then are his thoughts.

It’s so hard sometimes to understand all the technical details of new regulations that come and go from Formula 1 so I have tried to simplify it for the everyday F1 fan in the hopes that they can better understand.

It’s an interesting topic as how do you improve and keep pushing technology without compromising the most important aspect to Formula 1, Noise and speed.
The new 1.6lt V6 engine is set to become more efficient than ever, and with the current rules not allowing refuelling you need better engines to manage fuel. The better the fuel consumption the less fuel in the car the less it weighs the faster you can go thus maybe allowing you to win the title.

The new engine will be set to a maximum of 15,000rpm down 4000rpm from current regulations. Even though there is a reduction in rpm this doesn’t mean that the cars are going to sound any quieter than with the current V8. I can say that the engine noise to me is the most important element of formula 1—if a shiver doesn’t go down your spine when a F1 car goes past then you are not experiencing Formula 1.

However the biggest benefit is to the end user or consumer. When the technology trickles down the line to the everyday car allowing engines to get more power from less fuel, that is when we will benefit. Most new car buyers want power but not the fuel tag to goes with it.

Engine regulations have changed so much over the last 30yrs, however no matter what engine they use or develop it will always better than the last one. Also with KERS being better developed we won’t be seeing a decrease in lap times as the FIA might increase the power that KERS puts out to compensate for the smaller engine .

If rules and regulations weren’t always modified and tweaked Formula 1 would just become another motor sport which is capped in time i.e. some American/European series. So I am for engine developments as long as the fundamentals of the sport are always at heart when decisions are being made.

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Kiril Varbanov
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Kiril Varbanov

+1 for the last sentence. I like the downsizing, honestly – it would usually include reduction from 2.6 6 cylinder to 1.8 turbo charged engine, with reduced fuel consumption and better torque, perhaps – so this is positive. I also agree that the current V8 breed had to be altered, and though Ferrari insisted that there was still more room for improvement, I really doubt that it would have bring a lot. In short – I like the new engine regulations, it’s the best possible compromise. I’m, however, very keen to understand them in details, especially the turbo regulations –… Read more »

Jack Flash (Aust)
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Jack Flash (Aust)

Yes. The Turbo regulations for the 2014 Engine homologation ruleset will be VERY important. So! What 2014 rule-set vista are we collectively aware of in the public domain at the moment? Apart from the 1.6 litre displacement capacity rule (we know); the V6 configuration (we know); the 15,000 rpm rev limit rule or similar; and the new ERS 120kW systems or similar; that still leaves a lot of regulation issues in Fuel blend/volume limit, Fuel Injections regs, Turbo regs, etc in the UNKNOWN arena. On Turbo rules alone – I seem to recall someone on an F1 site indicating the… Read more »

George Daszkowski (@GeorgeTheCar)
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George Daszkowski (@GeorgeTheCar)

I don’t like the electric pit lane, I don;t like the V-6’s and I particularly don;t like the one gear box set of rations.

F1 is not kit cars

F1 is being killed one paper cut at at time

AS they dumb down F1 they will have to dumb down everything else in order to keep F1 as “King of the Hill”

Dumb!!!!!

SteveH
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SteveH

George, I agree with you about the electric pit lane; it will be at least necessary to have some sound to alert the pit crews that a car is going past. I think, however, you misunderstand the gearbox rule. The teams elect their available ratios (30, I believe) at the beginning of the season and then can’t add other ratios. They are certainly free to change the ratios in the gearbox for different tracks; they don’t have to keep the same set of ratios for use at every? race. I think the engine regulations over specify the engine and stifle… Read more »

Warthog
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Warthog

I dunno…the pit lane thing might not be too bad. Right now, with the pit lane speed limit, the cars are pretty much just making an idling sounds when the going down pit road. They really only make noise when they peel out from the pit box….but then its quickly back to the low key noises until they get to the end of the pit lane. Hearing the engine suddenly roar to life as they hit the end of the pit lane might be pretty cool.

Spinodontosaurus
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Spinodontosaurus

There is a reason that the 20k rpm V8’s of 2006 sounded better than the current 18k ones; the revs. 15k rpm is not ‘low’, but the pitch will certainly be lower. The engines themselves are only going to churn out 600bhp, so less volume in the sound. I also heard that turbo’s place a restiction on the exhaust inhibiting the sound produced, though im not sure myself on that one, if true the 2014 WILL sound comparatively worse than todays cars. Tell me how it is going to ‘trickles down the line to the everyday car’ when there is… Read more »

Adam Vella
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Adam Vella

Good Point… but lets look at Traction control. It started up in the 80’s in Formula 1, now you can go and buy a brand new car for $15,000aus and have TC and ABS as a standard feature. Ok it took 20 or so years so why will KERS be any different. My car has a V8 engine, 3 years ago a V8’s would get you 16lt per 100km, now you can get 12lt per 100kms but I want 9lt per 100km’s and still retain 350kw of power.. some way or another used or not used in F1 it all… Read more »

Kiril Varbanov
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Kiril Varbanov

I’m sure they won’t – this is a billion dollar business, and the people with the white shirts won’t let it slip away.

A while ago, when the I4 engine was discussed, there were rumors of pre-simulations of such engine, and trusted sources have shared that it sounds very similar to the current ones, so no bother on the sound-noise side. At least for me.

gsprings
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gsprings

lets be honest,part of this v6 thing is to lure car companies back into f1,and to get some of that car company cash

Williams4Ever
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Williams4Ever

That was the V4 thing. Ferrari and Bernie bullied FIA to V6…

hoffy
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hoffy

Ahh, I remember the first F1 race I attended live. The noise, the smell…..hmmm F1 Goodness. But, what, they weren’t V12’s? Heck, they weren’t even V10’s or V8’s, they were Straight 4’s and V6’s and heavens forbid, only 1.5l in size (from memory, didn’t the BMW only spin to 12k?).

Guess what, they were still loud, VERY LOUD. They were still fast. They still ticked all the right boxes and sent a shiver down my spine.

I think this malarkey about the engine regs not being right is just that, malarkey.

Adam Vella
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Adam Vella

Agreed Hoffy…

hoffy
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hoffy

One thing, though, that I won’t be in favour of….electric race starts. James Allen has stated, on his blog, that this could be a very possible thing, unless they fill that loop hole

CoolBlue
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CoolBlue

500 cubic inch, all aluminum, fuel injected, big block Chevrolets a la Can Am are what real race cars sound like. If you never experienced them in person, you don’t know what you missed. I have a hard time relating to a vehicle that sounds like a Weed Eater.