Mercedes drop appeal over British GP penalty

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Mercedes have decided to not appeal the Stewards decision at the British Grand Prix. Here is the team’s full statement:

“The Mercedes AMG Petronas Formula One Team today decided to withdraw its notice of intention to appeal against the decision of the Stewards of the British Grand Prix.

We were able to prove to the Stewards that a car-stopping gearbox failure was imminent and, as such, were permitted within the rules to advise Nico of the required mode change.

However, the advice to avoid seventh gear was considered to breach TD/016-16, and therefore Article 27.1 of the Sporting Regulations.

The Team accepts the Stewards’ interpretation of the regulation, their decision and the associated penalty.

During the coming weeks, we will continue discussions with the relevant F1 stakeholders on the subject of the perceived over-regulation of the sport”.

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jakobusvdlMarko Kraljevicmini696Esteban MullerAndreas Recent comment authors

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Peter Riva
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Peter Riva

I think once they started talking it was a case of “in for a penny, in for a pound.”
And I think these rules have gone too far.
Will someone PLEASE confirm that if they put out a pit lane notice board they could say anything they damn well please? Then my advice? Get a 50″ LCD screen and tell the driver any damn thing what you want to. That’ll lower the cost of F1… not.

Andreas
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Andreas

As I understand it, the means of transmitting the message (radio, pit board or semaphore) doesn’t matter – the regulation simply says “the driver must drive the car alone and unaided”, and the list of messages that are allowed doesn’t mention the radio specifically. Which leads me to believe they are forbidden, in whatever form they may be. We call it a “radio ban” since radio is the prime communication device between the pit and the car, but it is intended as a “message ban”.

Esteban Muller
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Esteban Muller

Cant confirm Andreas! Dont want to incur penalty! =)

Marko Kraljevic
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Marko Kraljevic

Oh that’s too funny, I didn’t know (actually, it’s very sad). The notice board to the drivers is also regulated, wth. What losers. Yeah, park a nondescript van on top of a hill and have the HUGE LCD screen just beam the messages.

Fly it on a blimp, so nobody can get to it, lol; & have the messages seem to be directed at the other driver(s). xD

*Set up a SAM site, if FIA tries to shoot it down

Andreas
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Andreas

They got what they wanted, even without an appeal. Now they (and all teams) know the cost, and can factor it in when they do their strategy calls.

mini696
Member

I don’t think that was ever their intention. The penalties after all aren’t consistant.

Marko Kraljevic
Guest
Marko Kraljevic

Of course… If the regulation is “the driver must drive the car alone and unaided”, then they must amend the rule to exclude any and all VOiP communications. Racing without any NAZI, heil hitler, decisions would be great.

(Some guys, on the side, deciding what is and isn’t allowed)

jakobusvdl
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jakobusvdl

I think the more sensible ‘radio ban’ would have been to ban the broadcast of any pit to driver comms (particularly the cringeworthy cool down lap comments from the winners).
If the team that puts up all the bucks can use all of its technical resources to get the most out of the car, let them.
So much of the technology of F1 is invisible to the fans, let this be another invisible bit.