TPF Podcast Mailbag

29

We enjoy our “Mailbag” question session on our TPF Podcast and if you have a question you would like to ask Negative Camber, Grace or Paul, just leave your question in the comment section below and we will read and answer your question on our podcast. 

Negative Camber
Negative Camber
Leave us a message in the comment section below and we’ll read and answer your question on the podcast.
0 0 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

29 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Pat Goodman

These are questions for Mr. International, aka Paul. Both Lewis and Bottas experienced a tire failure last week where the tread separated from the carcass. The video and still images clearly show delimitation. Delamination will occur when the internal temperature exceeds a point at which the adhesive strength is not as strong as the centripetal force. However during the race the apparent (surface) tire temperature did not exceed Perrelli’s guidelines. Therefore the internal temperature must have been higher than at the surface. Increasing the tire pressure mitigates carcass flexing and lowers the internal heat generation resulting in this weeks’ pressure… Read more »

Erik van Klinken

Hi there, just discovered your show and liking it a lot! I have a question for both Mr. N. Camber (if that is your real name) as well as Paul: when looking at onboards from an F1 race, what are you focusing on? Or to put it another way: how do you know when a driver is struggling with a particular aspect of the car? Is there a method to analysing the onboard shots? To me, it seems all I can consistently take from watching them is whether or not they can get past the guy in front or not.… Read more »

Tom Firth

In our lives if we get fired from something, its generally with immediate effect. How does a professional athlete in F1 or really most other sports cope with the idea they’ve been shown the door but are expected to perform at an elite level for perhaps several months? Seb Vettel is the obvious current example of this. It’s kind of different when they leave on or at least partially on their own terms as that is sort of like an extended notice period I imagine or even if they have some knowledge as to their next destination at a guess?… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Tom Firth
Xean Drury

I’m sure Todd or Paul could answer this better, but in Seb’s case, there’s two factors that will keep him pushing fast on course. When the lights go out, drivers like all elite athletes, get into ‘the zone’. It may sound like hyperbole, but the get into a state where the outside world is basically put on pause, and only the activity at hand matters. 2 Seb doesn’t have a drive next year. So if he were to put at the back of the field, no one will want to pick him up. Now more than ever before, he’s marketing… Read more »

Xean Drury

In addition, when an athlete is no longer to get into ‘the zone’, they start making mental errors, in racing this often results in repeatedly getting involved in accidents. This is know as as being put out to Pastor.

Mark Walker

Completing my wife’s fantasy GP entry for this week….
When asked “Most places lost by a driver?”
SWMBO answered “Vettel”

Marc Schreiber

Long time listener but new to Patreon and also the website. Question for all of you: did you see the Fastest of All post that F1.com just put out regarding the machine learning rankings of the drivers? A few surprises on there, for me at least!

Andrew page

Hi guys. Do you think the sale of Williams F1 team to a “American” group of investors will expand the fan coverage in the USA of the spot and possibly encourage the likes of Hass and others to participate more in the long run.
Big fan of the show. Andrew from the uk

Last edited 1 month ago by Andrew page
Marshal Ed

I guess Lewis is ready to retire https://youtu.be/t6H2wU8IjI0

PG

Just watching the start of the Indy 500 with the empty stands. It brought back the worst memories of a F1 race featuring six cars. The stands were nearly empty at the finish. The best camera angle at the flag was over the shoulders of two fans who stayed and yelled “Boo” on every lap.

PG

Regarding the exiting of an Indy car with shields should be a concern for all. However one must find the root cause of slow exits and not assign cause based on impressions. In reviewing the videos there were several items that led to slow exits. Immediately after an incident the state of the driver impacts process; injury, mental state, and hormone recovery all impact reaction time. The steering wheels do not always release easily or quickly. Seat belt release is mechanically quick unless the driver is mentally confounded. Then there is a plethora of cables, drinks tubes, and cooling hoses… Read more »

PG

The comment that blacks clothes, or racing suits, are naturally hotter may not be a true statement. Studies show that the heat conduction of the material may actually make black the same as other colors. As driving suits are designed to insulate from heat, it is reasonable to assume that Bottas would loose 3 kg in any color as the cockpit temperature is so high. https://www.npr.org/2012/07/25/157302810/summer-science-clothes-keep-you-cool-more-or-less

Mark Walker

Two questions: 1. Why are you not giving Lance Stroll any love? He is high in the driver standing, doing a decent job of driving the car and staying out of trouble. He deserved earlier ridicule and skepticism, but he seems to have grown as a driver and become a legit F1 driver. He’s not my favorite, and other people might deserve or do better in the seat, but if its OK to make light of him in the past he deserves the flip side of plaudits for his recent performance. (Mention of Flip included for Grace). 2. I am… Read more »

Andrew Douglas

The only other place on the planet where this happens is the Fiefdom of Kent.

4d56to.jpg
Carl Hingst

Good morning, Todd! This question is for both you and Mr. International. First off, I continue to love your podcast and look forward to each week’s episode. I have been a listener since 2014. My question has to do with ground effects. Ground effects were banned from the support a long time ago, and I’m curious as to why they aren’t being reconsidered. For example, would a significant reduction in downforce/wing withe the reintroduction of ground effects promote closer racing and non-DRS passing? Let me know what you think! P.S. – As a fellow IPA lover, have you, Paul, had Bell’s Hopsolution? It’s a Double IPA that… Read more »

Billy D.

So I have my re-watch on in the background at my office this morning. Vettel and LeClerc are being interviewed. Behind them, you can see the crew stretching and generally preparing for the race. What I want to know is, who’s the asshole in the shot, standing around in LeClerc’s garage bay, hanging on to some handcart? No stretching. No pretense. I think the guy was having a smoke and an espresso back there. Maybe indicative of why Ferrari is stinking it up right now?

Xean Drury

He’s the ‘Ideas Guy’ Leave him alone. 

Andrew page

This maybe a question not for now but for the off season. Are we about to see a father/son in F1 event that will smash all others. I talking about a Mr m Schumacher Jr and Ferrari collaboration.with the upcoming regulation changes and M sch the 2nd being available to start his F1 crusade imminently. What are your thoughts,hopes and dreams of the three of you as ti what may happen moving forward. Is this the one thing that will turn Ferrari around from its current miss fortune? Or am I just living in cloud Cuckoo land?

Pat Goodman

Dear Todd and Paul, I am concerned by the concept of reverse grids for several reasons. These concerns are independent of the type of “starting order inversion” applied. Starting order inversion examples include; reverse the entire grid, or just reverse the order of Q3, or one of many other permutations. In each case, there is an implied disincentive for the top teams to continue to innovate. This is my first concern. In a series where the entrants are all essentially equal in lap time performance (can you spell NASCAR?), inverted starts may add interest. However in a series in which… Read more »

Steve

Hey Todd and Paul,

I was watching practice 1 and the Sky F1 team commented that Lewis had “1 minute and change to get back to the pits and get off that set of tires.” What rule are they referring to? Thanks so much for all that you do!

Andrew Douglas

Okay, so here’s a radical idea prompted by this weekend’s race at Mugello. We all know that the whole revenue thing re the Scuderia is and always has been absurd. Ferrari gets special treatment simply because they’re Ferrari, and without them F1 wouldn’t be F1. That’s completely cockeyed and utterly unfair. Or as we say here in the States (along with our compadres in the Sovereign Fiefdom of Kent), “Bullshit.” But what if we change the payout model? What if we come up with a way to reward Ferrari for being Ferrari, but alter the arrangement so that it incentivizes… Read more »

Fabio

Hey guys,
Quick question about the floor skidding along the ground, whilst is looks great with all the sparks (cue Bernie at the FIA meeting), how much time (if any) is lost by the friction generated by it. Since we’re dealing with fractions of seconds over a 90sec lap.
Would it be better to reduce the amount of time that it skids (and therefore slows the car down) or is the benefit of being close to the ground out way the reduced lap time?
Sorry, bit long winded there.

Keep up the good work guys.
Fabio.

Xean Drury

Here’s a question. Why is F1 so hell bent against complementing a lap to lapped cars on safety cars and restarts? As much fun as it is watching the back markers tootle around for a whole lap, why not, as the commentators have noted on several occasions, just complement them a lap and be done with it. I can’t think of a situation where doing so would give any advantage beyond what is already gained by allowing them to ‘unlap’ themselves.

Pat Goodman

Sochi .

Discuss.