From a distance, Mercedes AMG Petronas seem to have innovated a performance-impacting dual DRS rear wing system that provides additional drag reduction during the deployment of the driver-activated system. While teams protested, the FIA approved the system and this has many Formula One fans wondering if other teams will now adopt their own versions of the dual DRS system.

Assessing the performance gains versus the cost of developing the system is a major issue. Mercedes boss Ross Brawn said the system is simple but if the chassis wasn’t designed around the innovation, it would be difficult to recreate or bolt on to an existing design.

Sauber’s Matt Morris said they’ve decided that the gains and costs associated is not something the team is willing to pursue telling AUTOSPORT:

“We have done some evaluation on it in the factory, but at the moment it’s not really working for us in terms of cost versus performance,” said the Chief Designer, Matt Morris.

“It doesn’t really stack up for us at the moment. And beyond the cost versus performance issue, it’s difficult to know exactly the potential benefits and then it’s only really useful in qualifying.

“It’s definitely a few tenths of a second in qualifying, but to get that [benefit] so many parts in the car would have to be changed. That’s the problem.”

Formula 1 fans will be watching closely to see if any of the remaining teams will arrive at the next grand prix in Spain with a dual DRS system. What is your guess?  Do you think any of the teams will adopt the Dual DRS system this year? IS the gain worth the pain?

7
Leave a Reply

avatar
 
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
Other File Types
 
 
 
5 Comment threads
2 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
7 Comment authors
RapiermanNegative CamberNathhulalBadCaptainMIE Recent comment authors

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Honda Hero (AKA @Gustuso)
Guest
Honda Hero (AKA @Gustuso)

Its so track dependent I’m not so sure that it will be copied by anyone of than those with enough budget left over. The McLaren F-duct was useful for the entire weekend for a car, the Merc system is only an advantage for Saturday. In these days of rapid degradation Pirelli’s and muchas Sunday overtaking potential its less likely whereas maybe pre-Pirelli it would’ve HAD to have been copied by all.

positiveCamper
Guest
positiveCamper

Not so sure other teams will be trying it because, as Peter Sauber says, so many parts of the car would have to be redesigned and remanufactured. Money is more effectively spent elsewhere.
However, this very aspect of the development makes it attractive for future car redesigns. If a team could come up with a practically-impossible-to-copy system for next year that has more advantages than the double DRS, they would really have something.

MIE
Editor
MIE

The pictures from Autosport of the Williams rear wing show that it appears to have been modified, possibly to accept a duct necessary for the Mercedes style DDRS?
http://www.autosport.com/gallery/photo.php/id/13295255

BadCaptain
Guest
BadCaptain

I do not believe the system is that expensive to design and implement, the issue is whether or not it is an efficient use of funds. With the only real gain coming from qualifying I think a team like Sauber must weigh the benefit of a fashionable upgrade against the cost and resources need to properly develop it. I think Sauber is making the correct decision to not develop it or at least keep it low on the priority list. Now teams likes RB, Mclaren, or Ferrari that have the money and resources will surely find that it is worth… Read more »

Nathhulal
Guest
Nathhulal

Why should we laugh at Tavo and COTA for copying best corners across the tracks around the world and building their track. F1 teams seem to be doing that in terms of car development for years.
Reminds of the childhood fable of bird in borrowed feathers.

http://bit.ly/IGobKW